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Hello Ron, You have brought up the subject that floats in and out of my 77 yr-old mind: what is Plan B?, when I can't travel/be a nomad anymore?
If you "can't be a nomad", wouldn't that mean you are so weak or your health is so poor that you really can't drive or fend for yourself very well? I don't think a RV park or tiny house village is a viable answer. There are assisted living places, and nursing homes...
 
If you "can't be a nomad", wouldn't that mean you are so weak or your health is so poor that you really can't drive or fend for yourself very well? I don't think a RV park or tiny house village is a viable answer. There are assisted living places, and nursing homes...
While health is a reason for being unable to live as a nomad, basically anything that makes you ineligible for a drivers license will accomplish the same thing... which could be a vision issue, narcolepsy, seizures, certain medications. Hopefully that is the kind of circumstance rather than a more severe infirmity...
 
If you can't drive but can get around other wise, then it would be best to live in a place where everything is an easy walk and decent public transit is also available... definitely not in the boonies.
 
If you "can't be a nomad", wouldn't that mean you are so weak or your health is so poor that you really can't drive or fend for yourself very well? I don't think a RV park or tiny house village is a viable answer. There are assisted living places, and nursing homes...
rrruuff, Thanks for consigning me to a nursing home because I am considering an eventual end to my wandering ways. :) And BTW, we will ALL need to stop wandering eventually. I'm just trying to plan ahead a little bit and consider possible options. .

Just an FYI, there are many possible steps before nursing homes. Without going into detail, my health is very good - for my age. Not without a few hiccups, mainly my eyesight and reaction time moving at highway speeds. But I'm not ready for a nursing home quite yet. And, on that subject, I might consider other more permanent options before I choose that one. Although I do worry about someday being consigned to some such facility against my wishes. Just saying...

As far as settling down where there is "easy walk and decent public transit" - that pretty much would lead one toward an urban environment where the cost of living is often sky high. In my experience, a lower cost of living is usually rural, if not really really rural, AKA off grid rural. but I'm not ruling that entirely out. No, my question was in the realm of "is there anything or any place I have not thought of yet?"
 
rrruuff, Thanks for consigning me to a nursing home because I am considering an eventual end to my wandering ways. :) And BTW, we will ALL need to stop wandering eventually. I'm just trying to plan ahead a little bit and consider possible options.
(y) So far I've done a pretty shitty of job of predicting what it's really like to get old... but isn't it really impossible? I think it's tough to manage the slide into oblivion, especially if alone (no designated help). Based on the experience of close family members who have passed recently, we tend to go from functional to dead pretty quickly. But plenty of people have long nursing home stays. I think if you need an interim "plan" that bridges the gap between being no longer able to drive, but still taking care of yourself, being in town and close to things is more sensible. A little off grid place may work for awhile, but those tend to involve more work and maintenance than being in town, plus if you can't drive, you're kinda stuck there. I see that becoming non-viable about the same time as vagabonding.

I don't believe an urban environment is necessary at all... an apartment or trailer in a smaller town with groceries, medical, a park, coffee shop and other distractions nearby should work, no? The convenience of services seems like it would extend the amount of time that it would be viable (stay out of the nursing home). The cost depends a lot on how trendy the place is. There are plenty of cheap places in the midwest, but some parts of the SW are not bad if you look around. Alamogordo, NM is one example that has a good year round climate and good medical:
https://www.city-data.com/city/Alamogordo-New-Mexico.html
 
My biggest problem with getting old is it is to easy to just to sit back and do nothing! My vision is getting worse but surgery can restore much of it. My joints and lack of physical strength limit many activities making it easy to just sit. Main reason I still work is to keep myself moving and thinking in order to solve problems created by my ever growing physical and mental limitations that I am forced to overcome. I’ll eventually probably end up needing a wheel chair but I’m looking at upright recumbent electric off road three wheeled cycles and until then I walk as much as the weather permits. Just because you become less able to me means you just have to figure out how to minimize the present and future impacts of getting old. With today’s technology it is getting easier and by working longer maybe I can afford a few of the solutions. Keeping moving and active, developing hobbies, social connections and new interests seems like it will be the only thing that will keep me from just sitting. Being in a warm climate or locations where I can be comfortable outside is the first concern in my case and my battle against getting older and stagnant.
 
rrruuff, Thanks for consigning me to a nursing home because I am considering an eventual end to my wandering ways. :) And BTW, we will ALL need to stop wandering eventually. I'm just trying to plan ahead a little bit and consider possible options. .

Just an FYI, there are many possible steps before nursing homes. Without going into detail, my health is very good - for my age. Not without a few hiccups, mainly my eyesight and reaction time moving at highway speeds. But I'm not ready for a nursing home quite yet. And, on that subject, I might consider other more permanent options before I choose that one. Although I do worry about someday being consigned to some such facility against my wishes. Just saying...

As far as settling down where there is "easy walk and decent public transit" - that pretty much would lead one toward an urban environment where the cost of living is often sky high. In my experience, a lower cost of living is usually rural, if not really really rural, AKA off grid rural. but I'm not ruling that entirely out. No, my question was in the realm of "is there anything or any place I have not thought of yet?"
Finding a "landing spot" with "easy walk and decent public transit" might be a challenge. I live in an inexpensive large midwestern city and, within 6-8 blocks, can walk to Kroger, Walmart, Walgreens, my doctor (GP), my dentist, multiple bus stops, Barnes & Noble, lots of restaurants (Five Guys, Great Wall, Panera, pizza places, etc), Trader Joe's, Aldi, banks, etc. I don't live in a "sexy" city but my social security covers all of my expenses (except for the help I give my kids, which is why I keep drawing down my retirement accounts). Within 50 miles are lots of small rural communities which are losing population and where one might find inexpensive housing. In these communities when someone dies and their house goes on sale, it often sells at a huge discount to its "fair value." Living in one of these rural communities leaves one within an hour's drive of medical specialists, Costco, Sam's Club, dental specialists and the whole "big city" service sector.
 
Within a two hour drive of Omaha or Des Moines are rural communities in South Dakota (no income tax), Iowa, Missouri and Nebraska. Somebody might find a very inexpensive house to buy and still be fairly near Omaha or Des Moines.
 
rrruuff, Thanks for consigning me to a nursing home because I am considering an eventual end to my wandering ways. :) And BTW, we will ALL need to stop wandering eventually. I'm just trying to plan ahead a little bit and consider possible options. .

Just an FYI, there are many possible steps before nursing homes. Without going into detail, my health is very good - for my age. Not without a few hiccups, mainly my eyesight and reaction time moving at highway speeds. But I'm not ready for a nursing home quite yet. And, on that subject, I might consider other more permanent options before I choose that one. Although I do worry about someday being consigned to some such facility against my wishes. Just saying...

As far as settling down where there is "easy walk and decent public transit" - that pretty much would lead one toward an urban environment where the cost of living is often sky high. In my experience, a lower cost of living is usually rural, if not really really rural, AKA off grid rural. but I'm not ruling that entirely out. No, my question was in the realm of "is there anything or any place I have not thought of yet?"
Perhaps Bob Wells vid concerning Caballo Loco. Maybe idea of an option. Or his vid about buying a small piece of land that will allow you to live full time on it. I'll be 75 in a few months and other nomad friends and l have been taking about getting adjoining parcels of land. Good luck friend.:)
 
we will ALL need to stop wandering eventually. I'm just trying to plan ahead a little bit and consider possible options. .
I plan to be scattered. So long as there is wind and water, so I shall wander. It's that bit before between lack of self-mobility and being scattered that's tricky to deal with...
 
Within a two hour drive of Omaha or Des Moines are rural communities in South Dakota (no income tax), Iowa, Missouri and Nebraska. Somebody might find a very inexpensive house to buy and still be fairly near Omaha or Des Moines.
Illinois has inexpensive rural homes, too. Some as low as $15-$20K that don't need a ton of work. Most in good shape are $45-$50K.

Also, the USDA Rural Development has programs to help low-income and moderate income people buy a rural home with no money down and interest rates between 1 & 4 percent. They especially help seniors.

There are rural bus systems, but I'm not sure if every area has them. Probably not out west, but here most rural areas have bus service so residents can get to dialysis and doctor appts.

See: https://www.rd.usda.gov/programs-services/single-family-housing-programs
 
Illinois has inexpensive rural homes, too. Some as low as $15-$20K that don't need a ton of work. Most in good shape are $45-$50K.

Also, the USDA Rural Development has programs to help low-income and moderate income people buy a rural home with no money down and interest rates between 1 & 4 percent. They especially help seniors.

There are rural bus systems, but I'm not sure if every area has them. Probably not out west, but here most rural areas have bus service so residents can get to dialysis and doctor appts.

See: https://www.rd.usda.gov/programs-services/single-family-housing-programs
This info on the USDA Rural Development may be one of the very best directions for anyone looking for a landing place. Thank you for sharing this. I wish every RV related forum would talk about this. Carla, do you happen to know how one would proceed with the USDA program?
I can google that of course, but I thought perhaps you or someone you know has direct experience with this. Thanks, Dan H
 
This info on the USDA Rural Development may be one of the very best directions for anyone looking for a landing place. Thank you for sharing this. I wish every RV related forum would talk about this. Carla, do you happen to know how one would proceed with the USDA program?
I can google that of course, but I thought perhaps you or someone you know has direct experience with this. Thanks, Dan H
Call any USDA office in a state where you want to live. If you know which area of the state, even better.

Here is what I did to find the local office I wanted in Illinois:

In Google I typed:

USDA > Rural Development > Illinois offices

That sent me here: https://www.rd.usda.gov/il

Scroll down to: Questions? Contact your local USDA Rural Development office!

Click on View All Illinois Contacts

https://www.rd.usda.gov/contact-page/illinois-contacts
Now you are at the Field Office Directory (for all Field Offices in Illinois)

It should be similar for every state.

Thanks Dan
 
Illinois has inexpensive rural homes, too. Some as low as $15-$20K that don't need a ton of work. Most in good shape are $45-$50K.

Also, the USDA Rural Development has programs to help low-income and moderate income people buy a rural home with no money down and interest rates between 1 & 4 percent. They especially help seniors.

There are rural bus systems, but I'm not sure if every area has them. Probably not out west, but here most rural areas have bus service so residents can get to dialysis and doctor appts.

See: https://www.rd.usda.gov/programs-services/single-family-housing-programs
Carla, Thanks for the link. I did take a quick look and only saw references to Single FAMILY assistance and nothing about Senior Single Retired Person assistance. It doesn't mean it's not there. Just that the site seems focused differently. I'll look at it that possibility more though. I am also thinking that taking out a 30 year loan much past retirement age might seem a bit optimistic to most lenders. Even with gov backing. But who knows? :)

What I have seen are owner financed bare lots/acreage with 3-5 year pay off that might work for better for me. It's just the exact where and when and can I park and live in an RV there? Maybe build a storage shed and a 55 gal sewer tank to meet the minimum requirements. I really didn't want to go back to home ownership/financing/mortgage living. I know that often what someone wants doesn't always match possibilities. But I can hope. Maybe I could find a cheap and legal shack in some dying Midwest or Western town that I can hide an RV behind to live in? I would love to just find an out of the way inexpensive RV park I could just pull into and pay <$250. Dreaming...
 
Carla, Thanks for the link. I did take a quick look and only saw references to Single FAMILY assistance and nothing about Senior Single Retired Person assistance. It doesn't mean it's not there. Just that the site seems focused differently. I'll look at it that possibility more though. I am also thinking that taking out a 30 year loan much past retirement age might seem a bit optimistic to most lenders. Even with gov backing. But who knows? :)

What I have seen are owner financed bare lots/acreage with 3-5 year pay off that might work for better for me. It's just the exact where and when and can I park and live in an RV there? Maybe build a storage shed and a 55 gal sewer tank to meet the minimum requirements. I really didn't want to go back to home ownership/financing/mortgage living. I know that often what someone wants doesn't always match possibilities. But I can hope. Maybe I could find a cheap and legal shack in some dying Midwest or Western town that I can hide an RV behind to live in? I would love to just find an out of the way inexpensive RV park I could just pull into and pay <$250. Dreaming...
You shouldn't need a 33 year mortgage. From what I've heard they try to steer you into small ranch houses that don't need any work. Or much work. And rural houses (without land) are pretty cheap. $40-$50K. I'd want to make sure my kids can continue with the payments or buy it after I die.
 
Wrangling an old person easy camp hosting job even if it is a 6 month seasonal position can bring yearly expenses down to below $250 a month. I have a single 77 year old friend that does that now by using a golf cart to show people to their spaces for a week every other week and on his trips to town drives a UTV carefully on back roads. During the summer months he pays 6 months regular rent of a little under $400 a month.
 
You can find those. Cheap RV parks in Arizona but the question is would you really want to have a lot of close neighbors.? Some will be like you, some will be people on parole or on various substances.

Come to think of it I bought a hose in an upscale area. Turned out the neighbor on one side was on parole after servicing a sentence for 1st degree murder. The neighbor on the other side was just home once a month on a weekend, released from a prison for white collar crime in a Savings and Loans Scandal he was involved in. The guy two doors away was on a methadone program. I learned after that house purchase to first head to the police station and look at police reports. Not that did any good because the last house I bought had a peeping Tom nearby on catty corner who was peeping at the woman next to me and a couple of alcoholic neighbors who were always yelling and screaming at each other.

I am very much happier without being a home owner or renter tied into a lease. If I do not like the neighbors I am free to leave as soon as I can pack up and hitch up. I do not object to having my own place but I just have not always been lucky even though I always bought fixers that had those 3 very desirable qualities, location, location, location. At least I always made decent money after I fixed them up to looking very nice.
 
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^^^yes most cheap parks do have small lots and many have neighbors close by. Many have no tolerance for any behavior that might affect their ratings as their rates are usually based on reviews and there is a community of paying renters they must answer to. Finding a new renter is not that difficult anymore. Many are short term stay renters and they can simply be told to leave by the owner and removed by local law enforcement. Rates even though they are reasonable would be difficult to pay without assistance or a job at least in the ones I have considered. Private lots with one or two rental spaces seem desirable but tent to cost a little more. Free BLM land is better but you usually end up moving every 14 days which as you get older may become challenging.
 
Carla, Thanks for the link. I did take a quick look and only saw references to Single FAMILY assistance and nothing about Senior Single Retired Person assistance.
Grants for 62-year-olds and up might just be for fixing health and safety issues in your house. Pretty sure the grant can be used in conjunction with the mortgage. It is for $10K and doesn't have to be repaid if you live in the house for 3 years afterward.

I'll keep looking, but it says:

Who may apply for this program?
To qualify, you must:
  • Be the homeowner and occupy the house
  • Be unable to obtain affordable credit elsewhere
  • Have a household income that does not exceed the very low limit by county
  • For grants, be age 62 or older
What is an eligible rural area?
Utilizing the USDA Eligibility Site you can enter a specific address for determination or just search the map to review general eligible areas.


How may funds be used?
  • Loans may be used to repair, improve or modernize homes or remove health and safety hazards
  • Grants must be used to remove health and safety hazards
How much money can I get?
  • Maximum loan is $40,000
  • Maximum grant is $10,000
  • Loans and grants can be combined for up to $50,000 in assistance
What are the terms of the loan or grant?
  • Loans are termed for 20 years
  • Loan interest rate is fixed at 1%
  • Full title service is required if the total outstanding balance on Section 504 loans is greater than $25,000
  • Grants have a lifetime limit of $10,000
  • Grants must be repaid if the property is sold in less than 3 years
Is there a deadline to apply?
 
Maybe I could find a cheap and legal shack in some dying Midwest or Western town that I can hide an RV behind to live in? I would love to just find an out of the way inexpensive RV park I could just pull into and pay <$250. Dreaming...
You could convert a two car garage into a living space. Lots of rural towns are lax on codes. I've seen several garages on big lots for sale on Zillow for Illinois. Priced from $9K to $19K and up
 

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