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Tony's Dream

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 25, 2019
Messages
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Location
Nebraska
I'm not a full time van dweller, instead I take trips of 7-14 days. I am looking to buy a portable frig to replace my current Yeti ice chest. I currently only have a Jackery 240 which I know is not enough to power it 24/7. I am considering buying a Bluetti AC200P to provide the required power (and to power other small devices). I can plug it into my van while I'm driving and using the power pack only when I stop. The question is.....what if I buy a LifePro4 battery to power the frig? The Bluetti runs around $1200 vs the LifePO4 is around $240. Just trying to get the most for my money. The descriptions of the items below are from Amazon.

AstroAI 12 Volt Car Refrigerator, Portable Freezer 12V Fridge 58 Quart (55L) Electric Cooler -4℉~68℉ with 12/24V DC & 110V AC for Car, RV, Truck, Van, Boat for Camping, Travel, Fishing Outdoor

power queen 12V 100Ah Mini LiFePO4 Lithium Battery, Deep Cycle Battery with Upgraded 100A BMS, Max 1280W Energy, Up to 15000 Cycles & 10-Year Lifespan for RV, Solar, Trolling Motor & Camping

BLUETTI AC200P Portable Power Station, 2000Wh LiFePO4 Battery Backup w/ 6 2000W AC Outlets (4800W Peak), Solar Generator for Outdoor Camping, RV Travel, Home Use (Solar Panels Optional)
 
I have an EcoFlow Delta II. I had considered buying a set of LifePO4 batteries to replace my lead acid house batteries. The Eco Flo Delta II was on sale and included everything internally to charge it with 12 volt DC, 120 volt AC or Solar. LifePO4 batteries were still pretty expensive and required different types of chargers, controllers and knowledge to adjust them as well to get wired and working correctly. The EcoFlow Delta ll was basically plug and play and actually cost about the same after the added wiring, chargers and controllers as it was on sale. It also took up less space and was portable. There was an older discussion on power packs here on this forum. So far I am very pleased with my decision but prices and people’s knowledge has gotten better so it just depends on your layout and knowledge.
 
I recent!ly bought a 300 AH Lifepo4 battery to replace the lead acid batteries for my off grid house. Also bought a mppt solar charge controller. So far I like it a lot. Works well with my existing inverter and 12v loads. My existing 40 amp lead acid battery charger does a good job charging it when needed.
 
power queen 12V 100Ah Mini LiFePO4 Lithium Battery, Deep Cycle Battery with Upgraded 100A BMS, Max 1280W Energy, Up to 15000 Cycles & 10-Year Lifespan for RV, Solar, Trolling Motor & Camping
I'm seeing 600WH power stations for $200 on Amazon. Are they so much less because they don't have as many life cycles? Yours says 15000. This one says 3000.

https://a.co/d/0SGJGAZ
 
I just heard a story in Camp about Bluetti and 12 volt Ciggy plugs and a Fridge

Seems the Bluetti has a SLEEP cycle if 12 volt usage falls to a certain level and the unit won't automatically turn back ON when the 12 volt (refrigerator) demands

It Turns ON........Auto works OK with a 120 volt inverter demand..............YMMV
 
I'm seeing 600WH power stations for $200 on Amazon. Are they so much less because they don't have as many life cycles? Yours says 15000. This one says 3000.

https://a.co/d/0SGJGAZ

I saw those too. I guess I'm looking at something with more WHs. Trying to avoid having several smaller power stations. Not sure if I could go for two weeks with the batteries keeping everything running. My "idea" would be for me to fully charge the LifePO batteries before I go, having them run everything until I return home, then charge them back up when I get home. I don't have solar panels on my van and don't really want to install them. Maybe this is not possible. :cautious:
 
I just heard a story in Camp about Bluetti and 12 volt Ciggy plugs and a Fridge

Seems the Bluetti has a SLEEP cycle if 12 volt usage falls to a certain level and the unit won't automatically turn back ON when the 12 volt (refrigerator) demands

It Turns ON........Auto works OK with a 120 volt inverter demand..............YMMV
I had heard that too.
 
I recent!ly bought a 300 AH Lifepo4 battery to replace the lead acid batteries for my off grid house. Also bought a mppt solar charge controller. So far I like it a lot. Works well with my existing inverter and 12v loads. My existing 40 amp lead acid battery charger does a good job charging it when needed.
So you solar panels are keeping your battery charged continueously?
 
I have an EcoFlow Delta II. I had considered buying a set of LifePO4 batteries to replace my lead acid house batteries. The Eco Flo Delta II was on sale and included everything internally to charge it with 12 volt DC, 120 volt AC or Solar. LifePO4 batteries were still pretty expensive and required different types of chargers, controllers and knowledge to adjust them as well to get wired and working correctly. The EcoFlow Delta ll was basically plug and play and actually cost about the same after the added wiring, chargers and controllers as it was on sale. It also took up less space and was portable. There was an older discussion on power packs here on this forum. So far I am very pleased with my decision but prices and people’s knowledge has gotten better so it just depends on your layout and knowledge.
I was watching youtube videos about setting them. I'm not mechanically inclined and plug and play would be nice. I would need a book for dummies when setting all the adjustments.
 
I saw those too. I guess I'm looking at something with more WHs. Trying to avoid having several smaller power stations. Not sure if I could go for two weeks with the batteries keeping everything running. My "idea" would be for me to fully charge the LifePO batteries before I go, having them run everything until I return home, then charge them back up when I get home. I don't have solar panels on my van and don't really want to install them. Maybe this is not possible. :cautious:
sorry. i was thinking that power station you posted was a small one. I see it is 1280. Oops!
 
So you solar panels are keeping your battery charged continueously?
Pretty much. If snow covers the panels for a few days in a row I sometime charge with the generator. Too old to climb on the roof to clean off the panels. Lifepo4 batteries take a charge much faster than lead acid so I can crank up the amperage for a shorter time.
 
^^^due to my older lead acid batteries I was using the generator twice as much than I did after getting the EcoFlo Delta ll which made it possible for a bulk charge first thing in the morning charging both the old batteries and the Delta ll. On sunny days my small portable solar panel topped my old batteries off so with the Delta ll no evening run of the generator saving me time and money.
 
Tony. Every situation is different. I would consider buying the fridge you want first. Then you can run the fridge in the van at home under conditions similar to your trips.

Run it off of your current power pack and see how it does. Then you can determine how much battery you might need for it. That'll help determine your next steps.
 
My "idea" would be for me to fully charge the LifePO batteries before I go, having them run everything until I return home, then charge them back up when I get home. I don't have solar panels on my van and don't really want to install them. Maybe this is not possible. :cautious:
I ordered the 600WH one. Along with 220 watts Dokio portable panels.

My uninformed plan is to stay at a pay campsite when I need to recharge everything. Hoping just once a week.
 
I car camped for a while in my Prius. I had a dometic 18. I ran it off of a Jackery 500 and then in turn plugged my Jackery into my cigarette lighter. This way I would recharge my Jackery as I drove or had the car on.

The real issue with any battery system is how are you going to recharge the battery. In your case, you want to be out 7-14 days and very few systems can run a fridge for that long without being recharged. Solar is nice, but you need a fairly heafty system to recharge successfully. A minimum is 100 watts solar for every 100 amp hours battery. 200 watts solar is preferred. Also you have to deal with cloudy days when you might not have solar. That’s when charging from a generator or anlternato comes in. Also installing solar can be a bit complicated. Since you aren’t full time, you’d probably prefer to have an external portable solar system rather than an installed, and that gets a bit tedious.

So one thing your need to do is to decide how much effort you’re willing to exert to recharge the battery.
 
I car camped for a while in my Prius. I had a dometic 18. I ran it off of a Jackery 500 and then in turn plugged my Jackery into my cigarette lighter. This way I would recharge my Jackery as I drove or had the car on.

The real issue with any battery system is how are you going to recharge the battery. In your case, you want to be out 7-14 days and very few systems can run a fridge for that long without being recharged. Solar is nice, but you need a fairly heafty system to recharge successfully. A minimum is 100 watts solar for every 100 amp hours battery. 200 watts solar is preferred. Also you have to deal with cloudy days when you might not have solar. That’s when charging from a generator or anlternato comes in. Also installing solar can be a bit complicated. Since you aren’t full time, you’d probably prefer to have an external portable solar system rather than an installed, and that gets a bit tedious.

So one thing your need to do is to decide how much effort you’re willing to exert to recharge the battery.
When I travel I usually stay at paid sites every 3-4 days to get a nice shower and use shore power, especially when its cold so I can use my electric heater.
 
I went to a pot luck today, quite a few of the people were talking about all the electrical issues they are having. They are the ones with big battery banks and lots of solar panels. Is it really making their life easier? No, not really…
 
I went to a pot luck today, quite a few of the people were talking about all the electrical issues they are having. They are the ones with big battery banks and lots of solar panels. Is it really making their life easier? No, not really…
At 600WH mine is a reasonable size, right?

In Tuesday chat I was told to get two new batteries for my trailer. I want AGM for the trailer. Are those my house batteries? Never knew for sure what house batteries are.
 
Most likely your factory lighting, heater blower and controls, refrigerator controls, water pump, water heater controls and the break away electric trailer brakes as well as the electric hitch post jack ( if you have one ) are powered by 12 volt DC power. When you are plugged into 120 volt AC grid power a built in converter supplies the 12 volt power and charges your “house” or “trailer” battery or batteries mounted usually on the tongue of the trailer. The batteries supply 12 volt DC electric power when the trailer is unplugged from 120volt AC ( grid ) power. Depending on how your tow vehicle and trailer are wired some tow vehicles supply 12 volt DC power to the trailer house batteries while the tow vehicle is running as well. Solar systems can be integrated or independent of the factory system. If your trailer came wired for solar with a factory plug in for solar panels they when plugged in will charge the batteries on the tongue usually. Some people choose to separate a solar battery bank ( “house” ) from the “trailer” battery mounted on the tongue or independent system. Many people don’t distinguish how batteries are used and simply use trailer or house interchangeably as unless you separate or add your own solar system they are one in the same. Batteries are expensive and if you boondock using the factory appliances you will find in most cases you will go below 50% capacity ( which can shorten the life of or damage the AGM battery ) of an AGM battery in just a few days or less without additional charging. Running a small cheap generator or adding an expensive solar system both work but new battery technology should be considered if you plan on living on the road full time for 5 or 10 years. I have figured out how to supplement my old AGM batteries using an EcoFlo Delta Il and a generator/solar to keep from having to convert to an independent LifePO4 battery system for now but converting should be considered if you plan on living off grid for long periods of time.
 
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