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mpfarmer

Member
Joined
Feb 8, 2024
Messages
9
Reaction score
6
Location
Kentucky
Good Evening Everyone: I am new to all this and have been researching Nomad life and watching Bob's videos. I am from Kentucky and my mother recently passed away and I am tired of paying high rents. I am a novice to Nomad life and will likely start in my compact car. Any help or suggestions would be appreciated. Thank you all, Matthew
 
Welcome! While you still have a permanent address get a passport and valid driver’s license. Making your car comfortable so you can get a good nights sleep is most important! The more you let us know about yourself the more we can help!
 
Welcome! While you still have a permanent address get a passport and valid driver’s license. Making your car comfortable so you can get a good nights sleep is most important! The more you let us know about yourself the more we can help!
^^
Good advice here.

If you currently have a legal physical address try to get a Real-ID Compliant Drivers License. When presented, it proves you're not homeless, house less, nor are you residential camping.
 
Welcome to the Van Living Forum :)

Lots of good advice here already. And with spring right around the corner Kentucky has much to offer in outdoor recreation & travel. Much to see in KY.

It would give you a great "break in" to nomadic life and no doubt you'll meet some other nomads in the State Parks there to chat with and learn more about
what they have learned.

But before going on the road full time, it may be best to get acclimated to camping and just being out doors for a few days to get the feel of that. Seniors (usually 55 and up) may get week day discounts at State Parks (often these discounts start on Sunday evening thru Friday morning).

I've traveled Kentucky, Ohio, and West Virginia a lot as I live in southern Ohio.
 
Good Evening Everyone: I am new to all this and have been researching Nomad life and watching Bob's videos. I am from Kentucky and my mother recently passed away and I am tired of paying high rents. I am a novice to Nomad life and will likely start in my compact car. Any help or suggestions would be appreciated. Thank you all, Matthew
What are the rents in KT these days?
 
Welcome to the Van Living Forum :)

Lots of good advice here already. And with spring right around the corner Kentucky has much to offer in outdoor recreation & travel. Much to see in KY.

It would give you a great "break in" to nomadic life and no doubt you'll meet some other nomads in the State Parks there to chat with and learn more about
what they have learned.

But before going on the road full time, it may be best to get acclimated to camping and just being out doors for a few days to get the feel of that. Seniors (usually 55 and up) may get week day discounts at State Parks (often these discounts start on Sunday evening thru Friday morning).

I've traveled Kentucky, Ohio, and West Virginia a lot as I live in south

What are the rents in KT these days?
They are expensive. Trailers are renting for 600-800 a month and capers too.
 
Hello. I'm in a sedan. I'll answer based on what has worked for me.

First off... make car maintenance your top priority. Mechanical maintenance (routines & repairs) and administrative maintenance (registrations, insurance, etc). This is general for any vehicle.

Second, determine what your nightly parking situation will be. I put together a list based on all of the reading that I did from numerous sources and videos. I rotate out and never park/sleep at the same place each evening. This is also general. If traveling, plan these ahead... and also have a backup plan if things don't work out.

Next, determine your sleeping/bedding situation... as this is the primary purpose of shelter, and the primary purpose that your car will serve. Some lucky ones can lower front passenger/rear seating and make a nice long bed from passenger seat to trunk. I am not so lucky, but I am quite short, so I was able to set up in the back seat comfortably.

Also determine what you will use as window covers. In my opinion these are an absolute necessity for both privacy and safety. I use Reflectix with a black flannel side glued on with LocTite. I find that the black flannel doesn't look obvious if shined on... and it prevents window fog.

And determine how you will handle your toilet needs. I utilize public restrooms, but I also have a backup system in-car in case of an emergency.

At this point, most people make a list of what they think they will need. If you do this, you will spend a year of misery adjusting and readjusting your in-car inventory. Instead... make a morning routine and nighttime routine... what you will do first thing upon waking and breaking down your car camp... and what you will do to park, set up, and wind yourself down. THIS will determine what you actually need in the car with you. You will still make adjustments along the way, but it will be far less miserable.

Everything else you own can either go in a storage unit, or you can get rid of (sell or toss)

The rest... some food, eating utensils, hygiene items, a few sets of clothing, cleaning products... can be sorted out as you go, both in what you will keep with you, and where these items will live. I keep only non-refrigerated foods, and those go in a crate on the rear passenger-side floor. A basket with plate, cup, and utensils goes on top of that. I have a zipable clothing pack on the rear driver-side floor. A plastic basin goes on top of that with a washcloth, dishcloth, handtowel, vinegar spray, water spray, bar of soap, and overnite bag. In my overnite bag I have toothbrush/paste, and etc.

In the front passenger floor is my battery bank, and on the front passenger seat is my office/work items, which amounts to my computers and a small file box.

I keep the entirety of the rest of my household possessions in a storage unit.
 
^^^^ Good advice. For a while I was Prius Camping so do have an additional suggestion.

It’s incredibly easy to lose stuff when you’re living in a small space. Be fastidious that everything has it’s place and be careful to always put it back where it belongs.
 
Thank you so much for your response. I keep the maintenance up on my car and change the oil every 3000 miles. I would try to remove my seats to help with making a bed. I don't need that much as far a living and mostly i eat simple things like sandwiches and things. Thank you again for all your feedback. Matt
 
Hello. I'm in a sedan. I'll answer based on what has worked for me.

First off... make car maintenance your top priority. Mechanical maintenance (routines & repairs) and administrative maintenance (registrations, insurance, etc). This is general for any vehicle.

Second, determine what your nightly parking situation will be. I put together a list based on all of the reading that I did from numerous sources and videos. I rotate out and never park/sleep at the same place each evening. This is also general. If traveling, plan these ahead... and also have a backup plan if things don't work out.

Next, determine your sleeping/bedding situation... as this is the primary purpose of shelter, and the primary purpose that your car will serve. Some lucky ones can lower front passenger/rear seating and make a nice long bed from passenger seat to trunk. I am not so lucky, but I am quite short, so I was able to set up in the back seat comfortably.

Also determine what you will use as window covers. In my opinion these are an absolute necessity for both privacy and safety. I use Reflectix with a black flannel side glued on with LocTite. I find that the black flannel doesn't look obvious if shined on... and it prevents window fog.

And determine how you will handle your toilet needs. I utilize public restrooms, but I also have a backup system in-car in case of an emergency.

At this point, most people make a list of what they think they will need. If you do this, you will spend a year of misery adjusting and readjusting your in-car inventory. Instead... make a morning routine and nighttime routine... what you will do first thing upon waking and breaking down your car camp... and what you will do to park, set up, and wind yourself down. THIS will determine what you actually need in the car with you. You will still make adjustments along the way, but it will be far less miserable.

Everything else you own can either go in a storage unit, or you can get rid of (sell or toss)

The rest... some food, eating utensils, hygiene items, a few sets of clothing, cleaning products... can be sorted out as you go, both in what you will keep with you, and where these items will live. I keep only non-refrigerated foods, and those go in a crate on the rear passenger-side floor. A basket with plate, cup, and utensils goes on top of that. I have a zipable clothing pack on the rear driver-side floor. A plastic basin goes on top of that with a washcloth, dishcloth, handtowel, vinegar spray, water spray, bar of soap, and overnite bag. In my overnite bag I have toothbrush/paste, and etc.

In the front passenger floor is my battery bank, and on the front passenger seat is my office/work items, which amounts to my computers and a small file box.

I keep the entirety of the rest of my household possessions in a storage unit.

I totally forgot the trunk... in there I keep an automotive tote with things like fluids and tools. Next to it I have a small gas can, jumper cables, air compressor, hydraulic jack, and cross wrench. That is all shoved to the back.

Towards the front, I have laundry Items and laundry bag, duffle bag of bathroom/hygiene/first aid items, backpack for the gym, a miscellaneous bag, 3 1-gallon bottles of water, and a small box of cleaning supplies and rags.

I am constantly moving things from inside the car to the trunk and back again... trying to determine where they should best live. I'm beginning to think that this is just a continual task. 🤷‍♀️

I'm experimenting with a small container in the trunk with compost, and a compost tote in storage. I may use it to make a container garden in the storage, or contribute to one of my kid's gardens.
 
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