Spray Insulation

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Scott3569

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I am considering using some spray insulation in a few areas of my build. particularly in the walls of my van.. If you take a look at my videos you will see and understand more what I mean.. 

I am wondering has anyone else done this??
 

highdesertranger

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I would absolutely NOT use the foam in a can from the hardware stores I think a common brand name is called "The Right Stuff". I know a lot of people do and there are thousands of you tube videos of people recommending it. But I have seen more than a few long term effects of what happens to sheet metal that comes in contact with it, It rots. Now some people say to encapsulate it in a like a trash bag. IMO the stuff is a pain in the ass and not worth the hassle. Highdesertranger
 

B and C

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There are closed cell and open cell spray foams. Open cell will absorb water (Great Stuff). Commercial sprayer for houses use a closed cell foam (two part) that doesn't. Use closed cell if you must go this way.
 

Scott3569

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highdesertranger said:
I would absolutely NOT use the foam in a can from the hardware stores I think a common brand name is called "The Right Stuff".  I know a lot of people do and there are thousands of you tube videos of people recommending it.  But I have seen more than  a few long term effects of what happens to sheet metal that comes in contact with it,  It rots.  Now some people say to encapsulate it in a like a trash bag.  IMO the stuff is a pain in the ass and not worth the hassle.  Highdesertranger
Thanks for the Info, I did not know that stuff can rot Metal like that.. I will just use the insulation I am using now..
 

Scott3569

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B and C said:
There are closed cell and open cell spray foams.  Open cell will absorb water (Great Stuff).  Commercial sprayer for houses use a closed cell foam (two part) that doesn't.  Use closed cell if you must go this way.
Thanks Brian, I am using a Closed cell insulation now, it came in a big roll, it's used for noise dampening in vehicles but it is also insulation.. My thought was to get some insulation in the places this stuff can not go.. But, with the responses now. I will stay away from the spray in stuff.
 

AeroNautiCal

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Spray foam insulation for a vehicle or vessel should be of the closed cell type because this will not absorb water and hasten the corrosive effects on the sheet steel it is in contact with which is exactly what takes place with the tins of spray foam sold in DIY stores.
 

Scott3569

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AeroNautiCal said:
Spray foam insulation for a vehicle or vessel should be of the closed cell type because this will not absorb water and hasten the corrosive effects on the sheet steel it is in contact with which is exactly what takes place with the tins of spray foam sold in DIY stores.
yes I understand closed cell foam is needed, I have using a closed cell insulation now, But it is more of a sound barrier it cam in a roll 22ft long.. 

I have search for a closed cell spray foam but anything I find does not specify that it is closed cell..
 

highdesertranger

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WARNING, some people claim the stuff they sell at home improvement stores is closed cell, IT IS NOT. it forms a skin that is water proof but any compromise of that skin and the foam on the inside is not closed cell and will hold moisture like a sponge. Highdesertranger
 

Scott3569

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Thanks, I know that stuff is not closed cell. I Just want to stuff some of the interior body where I can not utilize as Storage.. the Local hardware Store has small bags of fiber glass insulation, I guess that is the route I will go if I can not find another option..
 

bullfrog

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Why not do as some have suggested and stuff a plastic bag in there and fill it with packing peanuts and a little spray foam. it can not rust what it doesn't touch.
 

Scott3569

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bullfrog said:
Why not do as some have suggested and stuff a plastic bag in there and fill it with packing peanuts and a little spray foam. it can not rust what it doesn't touch.
If I can not find a better solution, I just might
 

dreamrunnerjt

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Amazon has a diy kit for closed cell insulation. It would probably cover the majority of a van or truck interior. I say probably because I have not looked into it much. On the other hand, getting a quote from a professional is usually free.
 

KarlH

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The price is a lot lower if you buy it in 55 gallon drums (~50%), but you'd want to split it with several other van builders because you'll have way too much.

Another option to consider is pour-in-place polyurethane, which you can install in a more controlled way without a spray gun. (That's how fridges and freezers are made, i.e. a slow-expanding isocyanate/polyol mixture is poured between the outer walls and the liner.) And if you line the inner wall with 0.001" aluminum foil, that shold stop the diffusion of the blowing-gas and prevent ageing.

One thing to watch out for is that the thermal expansion coefficient of the foam is 10x that of steel and 5x that of aluminum. NASA has some technical papers on how they modelled and managed that with the Space Shuttle external fuel tank, and I think it wouldn't be a problem for most people. (In the 15' bay of my aluminum stepvan, I'd get ~0.5" of length mismatch when the temperature shifts from -40F to 120F.)
 
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