Plan to use a HotLogic and a 12v mug ?

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UtahPam

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I figure I can buy frozen dinners and frozen veggies and have a reasonably healthy meal in 2 hours ?

Maybe I will get a 12v kettle too?

Any opinions out there?
 

Almost There

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IMO you're far better off buying a single burner butane or propane stove and using it with pots and a kettle than trying to use electricity to cook with.

That is, unless you're planning on staying plugged in to shore power all the time, then go ahead and use 120V appliances instead.

It becomes quickly apparent when you are your own supplier of all electric needs that providing that power needs careful management and a frugal outlook.

I love my single burner butane stove. I use it inside the van for almost all my cooking (breakfast and dinner). I resort to my 2 burner propane stove for outside use when I'm  either cooking for a crowd or doing things like spaghetti sauce or chili because they take so long. I also bake on the propane stove outside.

Best buy on the butane stove is in Quartzite at K&B Tools during the winter but they're not THAT expensive even if you get it at W/M. Canisters are cheapest (app. $1.25 each ) at Asian food stores or at K&B.
 

XERTYX

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I have yet to try a hotlogic but if memory serves they use 45 watts. The formula as far as my learning to realize how much of a dent a 120 volt AC appliance makes in your battery is to divide the wattage in AC by the voltage of your batteries (12 volts in most cases) so 45÷12=3.75. 3.75 amps. That is then multiplied by hours of use. 15 mins would be .25 30 minutes would be .5 45 mins would be .75

EXAMPLE 2 hours 15 mins would be 2.25.

I use a different formula. AC inverters (the device needed to make household voltage from a battery) are inefficient. Cheaper ones usually even more inefficient. So to allow for losses I use this formula. 120 volts 45 watts ÷ 10 multiplied by hours. 45 watts ÷10=4.5 4.5 Amps. 4.5 Amps X 2 hours= 9Ah (amp hours) This formula works for me mainly because the math is simple. Just move the decimal point one place holder to the left.

A single walmart marine battery rated at 125Ah is a very cheap solution. But remember a good rule of thumb on many batteries is to use half of that number so as not to kill the battery.  So 62.5Ah since it uses 4.5 Amps 62.5÷4.5=13.88
You could run a hotpot for 13.88 hours before the battery is basically DEAD. That's for one device. You need to budget your usage carefully unless you have a large bank of batteries and a large array of solar panels and possibly a gasoline or propane generator.

That being said it is definitely doable. Possible better alternatives are butane or propane stoves as has been mentioned instead of or to augment your needs. Remember there are cloudy days when the solar cant keep up with your usage, but as the song says every silver lining has a touch of grey. You can learn extra skills. One I plan to soon try is usually referred to as "thermos cooking" you can cook many stews, and marinara sauces, curries, etc that way using minimal fuel and a thermos.

In conclusion definitely doable. Might take extra consideration and moderation. A good idea not to rely on this method entirely in many cases.

As far as a 12V mug. I've tried that. Drained my (small) bank and I ate coldish soup for dinner. Unless 12v mugs now come with a thermonuclear attachment I'd use that only when driving to keep your coffee warm.

Edit: stupid error
 

UtahPam

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Thanks for responding ....
I will have to double check on all the info you gave me.
From what I recall HotLogic is 12v and runs out of the cigarette lighter, that is why it can take up to 2 hour to heat a tv dinner from a frozen state.

I try to miss breakfast to keep my weight down so on the road I plan to use a 12v coffee mug and/or a 12v kettle
 

UtahPam

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XERTYX

the above message is in response to your previous message,

the do make a HotLogic with a plug. The one I am considering is with the cigarette lighter.
 

UtahPam

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Hi Almost There
Thanks for responding to my post!

I should have mentioned I will be traveling in a Prius.
I try not to eat breakfast so if I pop in a tv dinner and a bag of veggies in the HotLogic it will be ready in 2 hours.

A Prius is a hybrid car with a huge battery, I believe running 12v is just fine.


BUT I mus have my morning coffee so that will be a 12v mug or kettle.

Also I will have a cooler
 

UtahPam

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Hi Almost There

A Prius is also a generator

which is different than most vehicles, there are tons of videos on it
 

maki2

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Here is my personal theory on it. You have a vehicle that it will work in. So just go ahead and buy those items and try using them. If it works great. If it does not please you then sell them or trade them to someone else in the RV community.

Don't get so hung up on this type of decision making because you have a lot of other things to decide about. Too easy to get burned out waffling around with a hundred should or shouldn't
 

UtahPam

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Hi maki2

Yes it's best not to get bogged down in the little stuff, besides the two item full price will only cost $50-$60
 

XERTYX

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UtahPam said:
Hi maki2

Yes it's best not to get bogged down in the little stuff, besides the two item full price will only cost $50-$60
The only concern is that regardless of their retail price the devil is in the details as they say. If the appliance is only $20 but the energy to run it is gonna cost $300 vs $20 to run a $100 appliance which is best? Everyone is different but as someone who has been cold and in the dark because of their learning curve real life is a ... well it's a beach.
 

XERTYX

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XERTYX said:
The only concern is that regardless of their retail price the devil is in the details as they say. If the appliance is only $20 but the energy to run it is gonna cost $300 vs $20 to run a $100 appliance which is best? Everyone is different but as someone who has been cold and in the dark because of their learning curve real life is a ... well it's a beach.

That's right. I quoted myself. Probably greater a sin that talking to yourself on tour facebook wall but here it is. I have more times than I care to mention had the need to bundle up and learn to enjoy the near total darkness. It was always in a deep water slip. But I failed myself. I could have bailed and asked for help but i needed to prove to myself that i could live that way.
 

UtahPam

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Thanks XERTYX

I know I can do this, take to the road and all.
I have traveled a lot in my life with others and alone.
Of course as you get older you feel a lot less immortal !!! ;-)

I plan to do an overseas trip too sometime with my frequent flyer miles. :)
 

XERTYX

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I wish you the best in your travels. There are many possible ways to make your proposed setup a reality. Just remember you have a well of energy. It isnt bottomless. But it can be very deep depending on what you put in. Think of energy as a deposit account. You cant get 3,000 dollars withdrawal if if has a balance of $500 there is no overhead.
 

Rabbit

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I'd suggest the 12-volt version of the Hot Logic if you try this. According the best info I could find, it only uses about 45 watts. There's also no loss converting power to AC. I bought a 110 AC Hot Logic for use at home about 3-4 years ago, and have used it at least once a week on average ever since. I've been very happy with it so far, and the company that makes it as well. I also own the 12-volt version, but haven't got nearly as much experience with it. The few times I've used it, it's worked as well as the 110 version, and it seems equally well made.

If you do get a 12 volt mug, please be sure and review it here. I'd like to know more about them.
 

UtahPam

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Hi Rabbit
I have not picked out a mug to buy yet but I will probably get it and my HotLogic at Walmart because if I'm on the road and it dose not work I can return it there.

Must save those receipts !!! ;-)
 

maki2

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All methods of heating food in an RV cost money. The fossil fuels are expensive.
People talk about free electricity from solar. Wrong, it takes years to recover the cost of that investment in equipment

The only true low cost method of cooking food when camping is getting free fire wood. But that won't work for cooking indoors unless you have a wood stove which of course your Prius does not.

Cooking in your Prius while you are actively driving is going to cost less than using a propane or butane stove.

I will be out camping in my Honda Element this next week. I am taking a dual fuel single burner cooktop. It is small and compact, comes in a carrying case and the size is just right for a small car. https://gasone.com/products/gs-800p-portable-dual-fuel-twin-stove
Coffee water heats quickly on it as it has sufficient BTUs for that and frying things too.

A lot of people seem unable to adapt what they eat to be foods that are quick and easy to prepare in one pot. Foods that don't need extended cooking time. But I do also have a small 2 liter stovetop pressure cooker for making things like rice, stews, chilli, pasta etc. That little pressure cooker is a big time saver and therefore a big fuel saver too. Time savings is money savings when it comes to economical camp cooking.
 
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