Improved Anderson Connectors

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WalkaboutTed

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This is what I used. Unfortunately, I can't figure out how to put a link in, so just search for on Amazon:

CES 10 gauge 2 pin quick disconnect harness
$4.88, free shipping

Audiopipe 12" 10 Gauge 2 Pin Quick Disconnect
Install this into your 12VDC power cord to quickly
remove your electronic device without having to uninstall cables
Typically used with inverters, amplifiers, automotive and solar applications
Polarized Molded Connectors
Features
12" long
10 Gauge Wire For Heavy Current Applications
Polarized Molded Connector (Red and Black Wire)
 

SternWake

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https://www.amazon.com/CES-Gauge-Quick-Disconnect-Harness/dp/B0057ZQJ12

The Above connector is commonly calles a 12v SAE connector( society of automotive engineers)

I employed these widely all over my Van in 2007.  I found they wear out quickly, and they also get way too hot passing 20+ amps.  Stinky plastic hot burning finger hot.  And many failed with no discernable causation, or the wire simply pulled out of the molded connector and grounded out and blew a fuse or just stopped passing current.  I had many more with 18awg leads for lesser amperage devices and still found them problematic.

By 2011, I cut all of them out  and replaced them with 30 or 45 amp anderson powerpoles.

The 15/30 and 45 Anderson powerpoles all mate together and use the same plastic housing, the difference is the contacts inside where the wire gets crimped.

IMG_3435_zpsf4d68941.jpg

The Pic above, well it was on My Norcold fridge, and I had a bit of a fit when it stopped working and it was not initially obvious that wire had pulled from the molded connector. 

Below shows 30 amp anderson powerpoles next to SAE connectors for a size perspective, but I made a mistake in the orientation of the contacts on how they mate withing the connector.  The rounded sides mate together, opposite as shown, pushed against each other by the stainless steel leaf springs inside the plastic housings.

001copy_zps17f77645.jpg



With SAE connectors, they use SAE 10 gauge, which is 6 to 12% thinner than 10 AWG with reduced current carrying capacity.

Sae connectors can also cause one to hook up a device with reverse polarity, possibly ruining it.

Be extra careful with SAE connectors and make sure one is not hooking it up backwards.  Put a DMM on wires to ensure + and - mate with the appropriate side.  I used these as both input and output for charging or loads and in such usage could easily cause reverse polarity if not careful.  Also when they come on some items, like battery tenders, and they might not align to how one has employed them in their system.  Double check to prevent reverse polarity and/or label them to prevent this. 

Anderson powerpoles in the 15/30/45 flavors, red is always +, whether it is input or output.  One would have to go out of their way, in the dark, to reverse the polarity, where the SAE connectors one has to double check.

Also I pass 40 amps through Anderson powerpoles without fear of heating and melting.  I burnt my fingers on SAE connectors passing 25 amps, on those that did not melt first.

I have a large plastic bag filled with my SAE 12v connector rejects.  Wish I had that money back in my pocket and went with powerpoles instead initially.  Would have saved many a headache. 

MS, the insert stranded wire, crush it under a screw is one of the worst, most problematic connections in the electrical world.  It is halfassery for the consumer with little technical ability, read, not you.

Yes, the larger anderson connectors contacts need to be crimped or perhaps soldered, and proper crimping requires the proper tools and technique, just as proper soldering does.

Do not half ass connections by wishing one can simply crush standed wiring under a screw.  I am rather disappointed that anderson even provides this option, catering to the unskilled, and likely ruining their reputation when reports of corrosion and failure start filtering in.

Crushing stranded wire under a screw is simply a shitty unreliable electrical connection prone to developing high resistance and ultimately failing prematurely.  Avoid them when and whereever possible, or resign onself to removing the wire, cutting off the brown copper, stripping the wire insulation back further, reinserting, crushing it under the screw, and after a few heating cycles, retightening screws again, and perform this regular maintenance, especially in salt air or damp environments, or in high current applications. .

I've had to do this twice to my Meanwell since 9/2014 as the wires were heating excessively at 40 amps at these terminals, and foolishly, both times, I did not 8 awg ring terminals to employ to do the job properly.  So I get to do it again at some point.
Hopefully I will have sime nice tinned copper 8awg ring terminals of the correct diameter to employ.

 Yes many solar controllers use this type of wire terminals, amd I bet many are ready to type how they have been 'just fine' for X amount of years.  All I have to say is put a finger on them the next time your solar is making as much juice as it can, and do not be surprised if they are much warmer than the surrounding wire/ area.

I can't imagine actually desiring the crush stranded wire under screw type of termnal on any important electrical connection.  They insult electricity as much as ciggy plugs and connectors do.
 

WalkaboutTed

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Whoa! Well, those results are terrible for the CES connectors, Sternwake. I bought that because it looked like a simple solution-just connect the positive lead to my solar input on the CTEK and then connect my Renogy portable solar panel wires. It's already permanently installed, unfortunately. I was trying to avoid having to buy special crimpers for the Anderson Power Poles, just for the single, intermittent, low amperage temporary connection in my system. A lot of money ($35 on Amazon) for a one time use.

But, I'm going to leave it in place for right now. The 100 watt solar panel only pumps out about 6 amps at the highest, usually less. I have an inline fuse on it between the connector and the solar input. I'll also inspect it thoroughly every time I connect and disconnect that line, which will be used no longer than 12 hours a day periodically.

Thank you for the head's up,
Ted
 

highdesertranger

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I have to agree with Stern on this. I used to use the SAE connectors but have been phasing them out. highdesertranger
 
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