Banana Slugs Sauteed

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SLB_SA

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From North Coast Journal

Banana Slugs Sauteed


From A Taste of Humboldt: An Historical and Ethnic Cookbook of Humboldt County, California, assembled by Humboldt State University's Youth Educational Services.

Ingredients and method:
12 large banana slugs
white vinegar
butter

Put the slugs in the freezer for roughly one hour. Remove and immerse them in vinegar for another hour. Slug slime will congeal. Wash the slime off thoroughly under running water. Using a very sharp knife, make a vertical cut along slug's body and carefully remove the dark entrails. Also remove the small, fingernail-shaped shell from the slug's head area. Sauté them well in the butter and your choice of seasoning. Serving over rice or rolled into sushi are also options.
 

SLB_SA

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According to this article Armadillos eat slugs and can transmit leprosy to humans. From the link:
"According to the Centers for Disease Control an Prevention, the small, shelled slug eaters are carriers of leprosy. Research published in 2011 in the New England Journal of Medicine confirmed that armadillos were the only animals known to share the same strain of the disease as humans, and were believed to be the primary culprits behind new transmissions in the Southeastern United States over the past few years.
While the armadillo-to-human transmission risk is usually low, people can get the disease from eating under-cooked armadillo meat (yes that is a thing), or coming into contact with blood or feces."

I am not an expert of slugs or leprosy. This CDC article says:
"Recently, CDC’s Division of Parasitic Diseases (DPD) was contacted by the Hawaii Department of Health (HI DOH) for advice regarding three cases of presumed Angiostrongylus cantonensis (AC) infection. AC, commonly called the rat lungworm, is a parasitic worm and the most common infectious cause of eosinophilic (a type of white cell) meningitis in humans worldwide. AC has an interesting life cycle. Infected rodents carry the adult worm and pass immature worms in their feces. Mollusks (i.e., snails, slugs, or semi-slugs) become infected by ingesting immature worms in the rat feces. Humans become infected by ingesting raw or undercooked mollusks (these guys can be tiny enough to hide on a nickel; – check it out! infected with the worms or contaminated raw produce. Transmission might also occur through ingestion of raw or undercooked freshwater shrimps/prawns, crabs or frogs. In humans, AC causes eosinophilic meningitis, the symptoms of which can include headache, stiff neck, nausea, vomiting, low-grade fever, fatigue, and abnormal skin sensations (e.g., tingling or pain). In most cases, the symptoms disappear in weeks to months and most patients recover completely, although rare cases of blindness, paralysis, and death have been reported."

The lesson (to me) is cook your banana slugs well. This chart surprisingly does not list the safe cooking temperature of slugs, a sad oversight.
 

SLB_SA

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According to this NIH article, the safe internal temperature is 165 degrees ("Hosts of A. cantonensis such as snails, slugs, and prawns are considered safe for human consumption if thoroughly cooked (heated to an internal temperature of 74°C or 165°F).") As a kid, I used to eat redwood sorrel when hiking (& still do when in the redwoods). I have never tried banana slugs but a nomad in need might be tempted. Nature provides lots of edible options (which might or might not be eatable ("edible is usually used to describe something that is safe to eat, without regard to taste, while eatable often describes something that has some level of acceptable flavor")), some of which were eaten by earlier peoples (natives, pioneers, settlers, etc.) and could still be eaten today.
 

JDub

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Grubs are a very common food in a lot of the Western Pacific - In the P.I. they're roasted (these are BIG ones) and sold on the streets as snacks. Big cockroaches (Waterbugs) too. Some unique street food over there. Lookup "Adidas", "Walkman", and "Betamax" for interesting takes on local delicacies. How do they taste? Meh... Just fine at 2:00 am...!

:LOL:
 
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